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Ask me anything Tue, Oct. 14, 2014 16 notes
Anonymous Asked:
My grandparents recently donated their old iPods to an organization called "Music and Memory" where they give iPods to elderly people with Alzheimer's. On their website they make claims about the therapeutic benefits of music (with the iPods) and I wonder what our opinion of this is or if you've heard of it? Is this organization associated with real, MT-BCs? Is it still a good cause even if they aren't? Certainly it's better than throwing the old electronics away, right?

simplesongbird:

effyeahmusictherapy:

I want to make it clear that what Music and Memory does is NOT music therapy. There is a large difference between “therapeutic music” and music therapy, primarily the presence of and relationship with a board certified music therapist. Concetta Tomaino, DA, MT-BC, LCAT does sit on their board, so I am sure that she keeps them in line with regard to calling it what it is (therapeutic music vs music therapy). It seems to me that they are providing a great service to these people, and I certainly have nothing against the use of iPods in nursing homes, especially when they are able to choose their own music. That being said, this program in no way replaces the benefit of having actual music therapy services in nursing homes, and I believe this program would function at its best when music therapists are consulted for each participant. I see no reason why a nursing home could not utilize both this program and the services of a board certified music therapist. 

In addition, Music and Memory has premiered the documentary “Alive Inside,” which has caused many in the music therapy community to grow uneasy due to the fine line that they walk between portraying their work as therapeutic music and as music therapy. I have not seen the documentary myself, so I cannot give my opinion on that, but I know that there has been concern about it. 

With all of that being said, I do have a concern about the fact that they I do not see them address the potential negative effects of this music. Music therapists are trained to respond to any emotion/behavior/etc that music could elicit in a person, and if they do not have trained therapists on staff, this could present a problem. That is why I believe it would be best to have a music therapist on staff as well (in general, as well as in conjunction with this program).

In conclusion, having briefly looked at their website and based on my previous knowledge of this organization, I believe that they are walking a very fine line, but that they are providing a generally beneficial service. I would appreciate if they would point out the difference between what they are doing and actual music therapy on their website, as many people would not otherwise know the difference, but having a board certified music therapist on their leadership is definitely a large step in the right direction.

I hope this answers your questions! Please feel free to write back if you have more questions or comments on anything I have said. And also understand that I do not have any definitive answers on this topic, as this is all just my opinion. Thanks for your questions!

-Erin

I would just like to add to this AMTA’s response http://www.musictherapy.org/music_therapy_and_the_film_alive_inside/

Thank you for adding that! I was unsure if AMTA had an official response to this issue. I urge anyone with questions about this topic to read AMTA’s response. 





Ask me anything Tue, Oct. 14, 2014 16 notes
Anonymous Asked:
My grandparents recently donated their old iPods to an organization called "Music and Memory" where they give iPods to elderly people with Alzheimer's. On their website they make claims about the therapeutic benefits of music (with the iPods) and I wonder what our opinion of this is or if you've heard of it? Is this organization associated with real, MT-BCs? Is it still a good cause even if they aren't? Certainly it's better than throwing the old electronics away, right?

I want to make it clear that what Music and Memory does is NOT music therapy. There is a large difference between “therapeutic music” and music therapy, primarily the presence of and relationship with a board certified music therapist. Concetta Tomaino, DA, MT-BC, LCAT does sit on their board, so I am sure that she keeps them in line with regard to calling it what it is (therapeutic music vs music therapy). It seems to me that they are providing a great service to these people, and I certainly have nothing against the use of iPods in nursing homes, especially when they are able to choose their own music. That being said, this program in no way replaces the benefit of having actual music therapy services in nursing homes, and I believe this program would function at its best when music therapists are consulted for each participant. I see no reason why a nursing home could not utilize both this program and the services of a board certified music therapist. 

In addition, Music and Memory has premiered the documentary “Alive Inside,” which has caused many in the music therapy community to grow uneasy due to the fine line that they walk between portraying their work as therapeutic music and as music therapy. I have not seen the documentary myself, so I cannot give my opinion on that, but I know that there has been concern about it. 

With all of that being said, I do have a concern about the fact that they I do not see them address the potential negative effects of this music. Music therapists are trained to respond to any emotion/behavior/etc that music could elicit in a person, and if they do not have trained therapists on staff, this could present a problem. That is why I believe it would be best to have a music therapist on staff as well (in general, as well as in conjunction with this program).

In conclusion, having briefly looked at their website and based on my previous knowledge of this organization, I believe that they are walking a very fine line, but that they are providing a generally beneficial service. I would appreciate if they would point out the difference between what they are doing and actual music therapy on their website, as many people would not otherwise know the difference, but having a board certified music therapist on their leadership is definitely a large step in the right direction.

I hope this answers your questions! Please feel free to write back if you have more questions or comments on anything I have said. And also understand that I do not have any definitive answers on this topic, as this is all just my opinion. Thanks for your questions!

-Erin





Photo Post Sun, Sep. 28, 2014 57 notes

(Source: thrivemusictherapy)




Link Post Sun, Sep. 21, 2014 6 notes

imagine.magazine 2014 Issue

thrivemusictherapy:

imagine is an annual online magazine sharing evidence-based information and trends related to early childhood music therapy through various media. 

Excellent resource for families and music therapists working in early childhood settings. Multimedia content, sample interventions, original songs, and it’s all FREE!




Text Post Sat, Sep. 20, 2014 14 notes

My Professor Was Wrong About Music Therapy

thrivemusictherapy:

I just finished taking the GRE and it is looking hopeful that I won’t have to sit for it again. With any luck, this time next year I’ll be starting a graduate program in music therapy. With hopes of the future close to my mind, some memories of undergrad are also rising to the surface. All music therapy majors are accustomed to explaining and advocating for their major, but my senior year of college faced me with an advocacy opportunity that I left unfulfilled. Sharing it here, I hope to encourage others who find themselves in a situation in which a person of authority is incredulous toward what you have to say.

It was my research methods class, taught by a tenured psychology professor whose research focused on rehabilitation settings with people who suffered acquired brain trauma. She was describing how her research was impacting the re-acquisition of language. Knowing about Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) and the neurological benefits of music, I raised my hand and asked if she knew about the research being done with music, language and the brain. After hearing out my little “elevator speech” about NMT, she looked at me with a little smile and replied, "If you worked with these patients, you would know the last thing they’re doing is singing.

Years later, I can’t remember my response. I knew she was wrong, both about music therapy and in the tone of her response. I remember feeling torn over whether to push the issue or let it lie because she was a figure of authority. Ultimately, I wasn’t prepared for the possibility that she would completely blow me off. It seemed she didn’t accept music  as a legitimate clinical tool and only considered music a recreational activity.

What bothered me most, however, was that she hadn’t demonstrated a level of open-mindedness I expected of scientists. The scientific method doesn’t preclude any phenomenon of credibility, as long as empirical evidence exists. Scientific theories are capable of being revised as long as observable, reliable, and valid evidence is found. My professor was wrong about music therapy because she didn’t take a moment to consider that music therapy was on the cutting edge of her field, even though she probably hadn’t heard of it before.

As I move toward my academic aspirations, I will always remember this moment. If I am lucky enough to become a professor, I hope to never let my own biases (while not completely avoidable) close my eyes to possibilities beyond my expertise. For those who have or will face similar situations, I hope that you will have the courage I didn’t and not let the moment pass you by.






Link Post Sun, Sep. 14, 2014 1 note

Music Therapy Student Needs Help Graduating!!

saraandhergreatperhaps:

My friend is in his 5th year at Temple University getting his degree in music therapy.  He needs some serious financial help to graduate and his future profession is so underrated that I hope everyone will donate and/or signal boost this. Every bit helps.




Photo Post Fri, Sep. 12, 2014 276 notes

thrivemusictherapy:

Moore, K.S. (2013) A systematic review on the neural effects of music on emotion regulation: Implications for music therapy practice. Journal of Music Therapy, 50(3). 198-242.

thrivemusictherapy:

Moore, K.S. (2013) A systematic review on the neural effects of music on emotion regulation: Implications for music therapy practice. Journal of Music Therapy, 50(3). 198-242.




Video Post Thu, Sep. 11, 2014 14 notes

thrivemusictherapy:

When Meds Fail: A Case for Music Therapy

Tim Ringgold, MT-BC, at TedxYouth




Video Post Thu, Sep. 11, 2014 23 notes

thrivemusictherapy:

Talking about music therapy with advocacy in mind.

3 Points To Consider FIRST
1. Can they relate to my description on a personal level?
2. Am I using language they understand?
3. When I describe music therapy, are they able to picture the face of someone to whom they could refer for my music therapy services?

(via MusicTherapyEd.com)




Link Post Wed, Sep. 10, 2014 33 notes

Music Therapy and the Film, "Alive Inside" American Music Therapy Association

thrivemusictherapy:

Important clarification from the American Music Therapy Association regarding the documentary “Alive Inside”. Highlights below, bold type emphasis added by me.

  •  American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) officials met with the film’s director and outlined problem areas a year ago. AMTA edited the script to correct misleading comments, recommending re-filming certain segments as well. Our attempts to correct misleading and inaccurate information went unheeded, which is why AMTA and AMTA’s Executive Director, Dr. Andrea Farbman did not agree to be partners nor be listed as such.
  • The use of personalized music programs delivered by iPods with headphones facilitated by nursing home personnel is not clinical music therapy. 
  • The public should be aware that in some cases the iPod can cause more stress and harm to elderly persons, especially those in late stage dementia. No negative memories of clients, which might have resulted from the music listening, were portrayed in the film. 
  •  The fact of the matter is that almost anything a board certified music therapist would do using clinical music therapy techniques would potentially have an even more profound effect than passively listening to music.  Techniques used by a board certified music therapist, following an assessment process, such as singing with a client, playing a musical instrument with a client, involving the family in the process, can all have profound and important effects.
  • Furthermore, some news outlets mistakenly label the “Music and Memory” program as music therapy or they interchangeably talk about the program and use clinical music therapy research, which further confuses and misleads the public.



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